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Home :: Neurology Disorders

Social Phobia - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

 

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Social anxiety disorder may be caused by the longer-term effects of not fitting in, or being bullied, rejected or ignored. Exposure to the feared social situation almost invariably provokes anxiety, which may take the form of a situationally bound or situationally predisposed panic attack. Social anxiety disorder is common, affecting from 7 to 13 percent of American adults in any given year, making it the third most common psychiatric disorder in the United States after depression and alcohol abuse. Social phobia occurs in women twice as often as in men, although a higher proportion of men seeks help for this disorder. Antidepressants were developed to treat depression but are also effective for anxiety disorders. Supportive therapy such as group therapy, or couples or family therapy to educate significant others about the disorder, is also helpful. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is very useful in treating anxiety disorders. The cognitive part helps people change the thinking patterns that support their fears. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are the oldest class of antidepressant medications.

Causes of Social Phobia

Common Causes and Risk factors of Social Phobia

  • Genetic factors.
  • Brain chemicals factors.
  • Anxiety.
  • Cultural factors.
  • Shyness.
  • Nervousness.
  • Stress reactions.
  • Emotional or psychological trauma.

Signs and Symptoms of Social Phobia

Common Sign and Symptoms of Social Phobia

  • Fast heartbeat.
  • Blushing.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Nausea.
  • Stomach upset.
  • Muscle tension.
  • Palpitations.

Treatment for Social Phobia

Common Treatment for Social Phobia

  • Antidepressants were developed to treat depression but are also effective for anxiety disorders.
  • Anti-depressants 'Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors' (MAOIs), have been found to help, and sometimes to stop the anxiety and panics.
  • Tricyclics are older than SSRIs and work as well as SSRIs for anxiety disorders other than OCD.
  • Beta-blocker to keep physical symptoms of anxiety under control.
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are the oldest class of antidepressant medications.
  • Clonazepam (Klonopin) is used for social phobia and GAD, lorazepam (Ativan) is helpful for panic disorder, and alprazolam (Xanax) is useful for both panic disorder and GAD.
  • Supportive therapy such as group therapy, or couples or family therapy to educate significant others about the disorder, is also helpful.
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is very useful in treating anxiety disorders. The cognitive part helps people change the thinking patterns that support their fears.