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Home :: Neurology Disorders

Personality Disorders - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

 

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Personality Disorders affect 10-15% of the adult US population. Individuals may have more than one personality disorder. People with a paranoid personality are distrustful and suspicious of others. People with a paranoid personality may take actions that they feel are justifiable retaliation but that others find baffling. People with a paranoid personality often take legal action against others, especially if they feel righteously indignant. The rate of personality disorders among patients in psychiatric treatment is between 30% and 50%. People with personality disorders often experience serious mental and emotional strain, causing additional mental health problems, such as depression, phobia and panic. Medications may help alleviate these related conditions. Anticonvulsant drugs can help reduce impulsive, angry outbursts. Carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol) or valproic acid (Depakote). and topiramate (Topamax). Other anti-anxiety medications such as alprazolam (Xanax) and clonazepam (Klonopin) to relieve symptoms associated with personality disorders.

Causes of Personality Disorders

Common Causes and Risk factors of Personality Disorders

  • Biologial factors.
  • Genetics factors.
  • Schizotypal personality disorders.
  • Schizoid personality disorders.
  • Paranoid personality disorders.
  • Dependent personality disorder.

Signs and Symptoms of Personality Disorders

Common Sign and Symptoms of Personality Disorders

  • Fantasizing.
  • Suicide attempts.
  • Excessive anger.
  • Financial stinginess.
  • Emotional detachment.
  • Odd, elaborate style of dressing.
  • Hypersensitivity to criticism or rejection.

Treatment for Personality Disorders

Common Treatment for Personality Disorders

  • Long-term therapy, while ideal for many personality disorders.
  • Medications may help alleviate these related conditions. Anticonvulsant drugs can help reduce impulsive, angry outbursts.
  • Carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol) or valproic acid (Depakote). and topiramate (Topamax).
  • Psychotherapy can help them more clearly recognize the attitudes and behaviors that lead to interpersonal problems.
  • Antipsychotic medications such as risperidone (Risperdal) and olanzapine (Zyprexa) can help improve distorted thinking.
  • Other anti-anxiety medications such as alprazolam (Xanax) and clonazepam (Klonopin) to relieve symptoms associated with personality disorders.
  • Antidepressants (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa), paroxetine (Paxil), nefazodone, and escitalopram (Lexapro).
  • Cognitive therapy (also called cognitive behavior therapy [CBT]) is based on the idea that cognitive errors based on long-standing.